Nicoya Effigy Vessel

mesoamerican-vessel.jpg

Dublin Core

Title

Nicoya Effigy Vessel

Description

This effigy vessel originates from the Pre-Columbian Nicoya culture of Mesoamerica. It was most likely used by a person of status in life or buried with them to follow them into the afterlife. Dated to roughly 300-500 AD, the piece is part of an artistic shift from the Formative period to the Early Polychrome period in Nicoya pottery. During this time, the monochrome slips and few colors popular in the Formative period became integrated the artistic ideas of Mexican and South American cultures. The Early Polychrome period saw the introduction additional, darker colors and more patterning. The glaze of the effigy bottle here, although highly worn after having been buried for centuries, still diplays the remnants of dark banding on each side of the mother figure in a wave like pattern. This patterned glaze, most likely created by a single brush, is typical of the black-on-red glaze style common in Nicoya pottery around 300 AD.

Creator

Nicoya Culture

Source

From the collection of Otis Warren Barret

Date

300-500 AD

Contributor

Curated by Peter Doubleday

Format

Fired clay with bichrome glaze

Type

Image

Identifier

1928.1.99

Coverage

Mesoamerica

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>

About the Original Item

Date Added
May 2, 2011
Item Type
Image
Tags
Citation
Nicoya Culture, “Nicoya Effigy Vessel ,” Omeka@CTL, accessed June 4, 2020, http://ctl.w3.uvm.edu/omeka/items/show/596.
Associated Files