Shrimp Basket

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Dublin Core

Title

Shrimp Basket

Description

This Hawaiian shrimp basket is an unusual object to have in a collection. It was usually used only a few times and then discarded because of the fishy smell and saltwater deterioration. Hawaiian women and children used shrimp baskets, or hinai ‘ōpae, to catch both freshwater and saltwater varieties of shrimp and small fish. A native Hawaiian vine, Freycinetia arborea, or ‘ie ‘ie as natives called it, was used to weave the baskets. When making any of the shrimp or fishing baskets, the weavers believed that if anyone stepped over the vine, the fishermen and women would be cursed with bad catches by Kū‘ulakai and Hinapukui‘a, the male and female fishing deities. This basket reflects an efficient and traditional fishing method used by Hawaiians, which lost its prominence in angling culture as an increasing colonizing presence melted the foreign and Hawaiian cultures together in the 20th century. Being an island culture, aquatic life provided much of their sustenance and therefore was a building block of their society; having an impact on both daily and religious practices of the native Hawaiian people.

Creator

Anonymous

Source

Collected by G. H. Perkins

Publisher

Fleming Museum, University of Vermont

Date

1905

Contributor

Curated by Madison Moran

Type

Still Image

Identifier

1905.2.15

Coverage

Hawaii, 20th century

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>

About the Original Item

Date Added
March 13, 2013
Collection
Fleming Museum
Item Type
Still Image
Citation
Anonymous, “Shrimp Basket,” Omeka@CTL, accessed September 22, 2020, http://ctl.w3.uvm.edu/omeka/items/show/831.
Associated Files